#ClearFacts Blog

Answers to common questions about marine shipping in Canada.

07/09/2017

The Importance of Ballast Water Management

Ballast water is essential for the safe operation of ships. It is used to adjust the overall weight of the vessel and its internal distribution in order to keep the ship floating safely, upright and in a stable condition. It is used to compensate for different cargo loads that a ship may carry at different times, including during loading and unloading. It also provides stability and manoeuvrability during transit.

31/08/2017

10 Questions About Underwater Noise & Marine Mammals

With increased marine traffic in Canada’s coastal waters comes an increase in underwater noise from vessels – and a need to understand the impacts on marine mammals who use sound to communicate, feed, navigate and reproduce.

23/08/2017

The Polluter Pays Principle

The term ‘polluter pays principle’ (PPP) is found in many of the guiding conventions, regulations and laws surrounding commercial marine shipping. However, the significance of the principle can be difficult to interpret.

16/08/2017

What Is Shore Power And Why Does It Matter?

Shore power is an effective way of reducing air emissions and improving local air quality.

10/08/2017

Endangered North Atlantic Right Whales

North Atlantic right whales are one of the most endangered species of large whales.

03/08/2017

Canada’s Top Marine Exports and Imports

Canada is fortunate to have a vast wealth of natural resources which contribute significantly to the nation’s economy. It is perhaps no surprise, then, that the majority of Canada’s marine exports and imports, by volume, are natural resource-based bulk commodities.

19/07/2017

How is the Marine Shipping Industry Regulated?

Commercial marine shipping is inherently an international activity. As such, the industry requires regulation at the international level. International maritime regulations, also known as conventions, are developed by the International Maritime Organization (IMO).

06/07/2017

Who is Responsible for Responding to a Ship-source Oil Spill in Canada?

A ship-source oil spill is defined as a discharge of any type of oil from a commercial vessel into the marine environment. In the event of a ship-source oil spill in Canadian waters, three main players are involved in responding to and cleaning up the spill: the polluter, the contracted response organization, and the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG).

22/06/2017

15 Questions About Commercial Marine Shipping

Test your Canadian maritime knowledge!